Saturday, September 26, 2009

We got hung on da ladder!

You do know about "da ladder"?
Hip people do!
XXOO Editilla O'rilla d'Aphasia

GOOD LAWD! MoMo is on CNN!

By Eric Marrapodi
CNN

http://www.cnn.com/2009/LIVING/wayoflife/09/26/colbert.dog.million.dollars/index.html


WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Mozart is trying to win a million dollars for New Orleans recovery efforts. But the charitable effort by the 6-year-old Cavalier King Charles spaniel may be derailed by a dog named after the satirical TV anchorman Stephen Colbert.

Mozart's owner says if he wins, all the prize money will go to charities aiding New Orleans.

Both canines are contestants in a dog beauty pageant -- but only one pup can take home the big money. The first round is under way, with a hairy finalist selected each week by the number of fan votes.

Mozart, or MoMo as friends and family know him, came in second last week in the Cutest Dog Competition with 2,780 votes.

This week he is running neck and neck with a new challenger, Stephen Colbert el dos, a Pomeranian Chihuahua mixed-breed puppy from Atlanta, Georgia.

MoMo's owner is crying foul. "It's just coming out of nowhere," Cara McCool said. "It's just unfortunate. MoMo is named after a famous person too, but he's dead."

The Cutest Dog Competition is run by All American Pet Brands. Over 60,000 people have uploaded photos of their adorable dogs to the contest's Web site. The final 12 pooches will get to compete for the grand prize, a cool million in cash.

"It's a fraternity or sorority with people who don't just have pets, these are their family members, their best friends," said All American Pet Brands CEO Barry Schwartz.

Don't Miss
Vote for Mozart
Vote for Stephen Colbert el dos

"He's my furry child," said McCool, a New Orleans piano teacher who named her dog Mozart after her favorite composer. "Sometimes I pull up chairs for him to sit next to me when I play or teach. He has been known to jump on the bench and actually has put his paws on the keys."

McCool has been active with several nonprofits working in New Orleans. If Mozart wins she said all the money will got to several charities: Redeemer Presbyterian Disaster Relief, Desire Street Ministries, Louisiana Teachers Save Our Students fund, Cavalier Rescue USA, Musical Arts Society of New Orleans, the Louisiana SPCA, and Teach for America.

"I already support them, but I can't afford that much because I'm a piano teacher," she said. If Mozart wins, all that could change.

Colbert el dos' owners did not want to be identified. They told CNN they have only mentioned the contest to a few friends and family members. However, they did post a note about the doggie competition on a Colbert fan site. The owners have not heard from the show but one of the fan sites says Colbert el dos will appear on "The Colbert Report" if he makes the top 12.

Renata Luczak, a spokesperson for Comedy Central, could not confirm or deny the pet's booking, saying, " 'The Colbert Report' refrains from commenting on upcoming guests appearing on the show."

Even without a television appearance, Colbert el dos appears to be benefiting from the famous Colbert name bump.

Colbert has wreaked havoc in other online competitions -- from a Hungarian bridge-naming contest to a NASA competition to name a room in the International Space Station. In both cases Colbert won the popular vote. However, NASA pushed back and instead of naming the room in his honor, the agency sent a treadmill to space with the Colbert honorific.

In both of those contests, the competitions received heavy promotion during the show, with Colbert urging his viewers to participate. However, in this dog photo fight, Colbert is having an impact without any direct participation.

Schwartz said the competition recognizes the outside influence of the Colbert bump. "If there are those Colbert-named dogs that can get those thousands of votes, we don't want to leave anyone out, so we added a new daily contest."

The voting for this week ends at midnight on Saturday. Schwartz said the grand prize winner will be named on Thanksgiving Day

La Maison Remy - House Guest...

video

Our baby Momma is here!

Hi Mommy!


Thanks for leaving... it was time!
Jessica still loves us...

Friday, September 25, 2009

Breeder's Permit Ordinance - Link to Ordianance

AN ORDINANCE to amend Article V of Chapter 18 of the Code of the City of New Orleans, to add thereto a new Division to be designated as Division 5, Spaying and Neutering of Dogs; to establish a mandatory spay and neuter program for dogs; to establish a breeding permit for dogs; to establish fees and requirements for such permit and penalties for violations; and otherwise to provide with respect thereto.

http://campaign.constantcontact.com/render?v=001icWSv9tauzD4yTItcQA9WZ5B53jcIU_Yzsu3BOViSPrAyujnOTZ41V9CCYD-ym07Q5q-60ZaRhxcNt3JqlurvZLGEsu36FizTDTbfdeURNc%3D

Thursday, September 24, 2009

My serious face!

My Mom is still making a movie... she is a STAR!
I have been walkin' my dog walkers for months...
Hi Mommy!

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Take a stand...

Spay/Neuter Frequently Asked Questions
Louisiana SPCA

The Louisiana SPCA (LA/SPCA) addresses some of the most frequently asked questions we have received regarding the Breeder's Permit/Spay and Neuter Ordinance introduced at the last New Orleans City Council meeting:

What does the proposed ordinance require?Dog owners are encouraged to spay or neuter their dogs if they do not intend to breed the dog. Dog owners who do not spay/neuter will be required to apply for an annual permit and will be asked to provide evidence of annual vaccinations by a licensed veterinarian and a permanent microchip.


Why should the government dictate what I do with my dog, my personal property? The State of Louisiana and Orleans Parish already have laws and ordinances that mandate rabies vaccinations, limit the number of animals per household, and determines the minimum standards of care for a dog. The proposed ordinance does not limit an individual's right to own an intact dog but instead requires proper veterinary care for intact dogs and encourages spaying and neutering of dogs not being bred to reduce animal overpopulation.


Why does this ordinance only focus on dogs? Aren't cats problematic as well? In Orleans Parish, ordinances already exist mandating all cats released from an animal control facility be spay/neutered. This means a cat brought into the shelter as a stray or for another animal control violation, must be altered prior to being returned to its owner. Currently, however, the ordinance is specific only to cats. Dogs impounded or brought in as strays cannot be altered without the consent of the owner. The proposed ordinance will require all dogs impounded or brought in as a roaming stray be returned to their owner only if the owner has a breeder permit or agrees to have it spayed or neutered prior to return.


How will this ordinance be enforced? This ordinance will be enforced in the same manner the rabies license ordinance is enforced. When an animal control officer is investigating a complaint or when an owner reclaims their lost dog, a copy of a breeder permit or proof of spay/neuter will be requested.


Who does this ordinance target? While all residents are strongly encouraged to spay/neuter their animals, the ordinance focuses on compliance from irresponsible pet owners whose dogs are found roaming or are being investigated for other code violations.


Will show dogs, service dogs, hunting dogs, sick or old dogs be required to be spayed or neutered? There are many legitimate reasons why dog owners keep their dogs intact. Responsible pet owners will be allowed to apply for a breeder permit to keep their dogs intact as long as the dog has a microchip, is vaccinated against rabies, parvo and distemper and its living conditions meet the minimum requirements described in the Orleans Parish Codes. Further, a licensed veterinarian can certify that a dog is unfit to undergo surgery and the owner will receive an exemption from the requirements.


How much will a permit cost? How much will a violation cost? An initial permit will cost $50. The annual renewal will cost $20. The fines for violations range from $100 to $500. Revenue generated through permit fees and violation fines will be redirected to animal control to better serve the New Orleans community.Is there a low cost spay/neuter option available? Absolutely! The LA/SPCA offers spay/neuter services for dogs ranging from $75 to $100 and additional discounts are available for senior citizens or low income residents who are unable to afford these fees. Additionally, many private veterinarians are willing to work with clients interested in spaying or neutering their dogs.

Have other cities or parishes that have adopted this type of ordinance been successful?Progressive communities throughout the country have adopted similar ordinances and had tremendous results. Before 1995, the Santa Cruz animal shelter in California warehoused 14,000 animals a year. Today, it takes in about 5,500. Euthanasia has dropped by 50%. More animals get adopted from the shelter today because they can stay longer in their cages -- spaying and neutering laws have resulted in fewer unwanted litters and fewer strays roaming the streets. Lake, Los Angeles and Stanislaus counties followed Santa Cruz's lead, as did the cities of Sacramento, San Bernardino, Houston, Asheville, and Palm Beach.How long will it take to see the impact of this ordinance? Within 12 months the City of New Orleans should begin to see a modest stream of income from the permits and violation fines. By the end of five years, the animal shelter should begin to see a decline in its intake. By the end of 10 years, the animal shelter should begin to report a decline in its euthanasia rates.

Contact your City Council Person today to show your support for this ordinance:Your City Council Person

Hi Mommy


Sam loved Jessica today... just like old friends!
Don't hurry home... we need a nap!

Good Morning Mommy

Thanks for not making me get up when you got up...
Pamela got me up at a resonable hour!
Breakfast was amazing...
Walk was wonderful...
XXOO

70 Minute walkin' - Henri & Isabelle

video

Did nothin' this morning... NOTTA!

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

4 x the lovin!

Awww... look at the babies!

Spay/Neuter - Frequest Asked Questions

I received this yeasterday... and wanted to pass it along.

Spay/Neuter Frequently Asked Questions
Louisiana SPCA
The Louisiana SPCA (LA/SPCA) addresses some of the most frequently asked questions we have received regarding the Breeder's Permit/Spay and Neuter Ordinance introduced at the last New Orleans City Council meeting:

What does the proposed ordinance require?
Dog owners are encouraged to spay or neuter their dogs if they do not intend to breed the dog. Dog owners who do not spay/neuter will be required to apply for an annual permit and will be asked to provide evidence of annual vaccinations by a licensed veterinarian and a permanent microchip.

Why should the government dictate what I do with my dog, my personal property? The State of Louisiana and Orleans Parish already have laws and ordinances that mandate rabies vaccinations, limit the number of animals per household, and determines the minimum standards of care for a dog. The proposed ordinance does not limit an individual's right to own an intact dog but instead requires proper veterinary care for intact dogs and encourages spaying and neutering of dogs not being bred to reduce animal overpopulation.

Why does this ordinance only focus on dogs? Aren't cats problematic as well? In Orleans Parish, ordinances already exist mandating all cats released from an animal control facility be spay/neutered. This means a cat brought into the shelter as a stray or for another animal control violation, must be altered prior to being returned to its owner. Currently, however, the ordinance is specific only to cats. Dogs impounded or brought in as strays cannot be altered without the consent of the owner. The proposed ordinance will require all dogs impounded or brought in as a roaming stray be returned to their owner only if the owner has a breeder permit or agrees to have it spayed or neutered prior to return.
How will this ordinance be enforced? This ordinance will be enforced in the same manner the rabies license ordinance is enforced. When an animal control officer is investigating a complaint or when an owner reclaims their lost dog, a copy of a breeder permit or proof of spay/neuter will be requested.
Who does this ordinance target? While all residents are strongly encouraged to spay/neuter their animals, the ordinance focuses on compliance from irresponsible pet owners whose dogs are found roaming or are being investigated for other code violations.

Will show dogs, service dogs, hunting dogs, sick or old dogs be required to be spayed or neutered? There are many legitimate reasons why dog owners keep their dogs intact. Responsible pet owners will be allowed to apply for a breeder permit to keep their dogs intact as long as the dog has a microchip, is vaccinated against rabies, parvo and distemper and its living conditions meet the minimum requirements described in the Orleans Parish Codes. Further, a licensed veterinarian can certify that a dog is unfit to undergo surgery and the owner will receive an exemption from the requirements.
How much will a permit cost? How much will a violation cost? An initial permit will cost $50. The annual renewal will cost $20. The fines for violations range from $100 to $500. Revenue generated through permit fees and violation fines will be redirected to animal control to better serve the New Orleans community.

Is there a low cost spay/neuter option available? Absolutely! The LA/SPCA offers spay/neuter services for dogs ranging from $75 to $100 and additional discounts are available for senior citizens or low income residents who are unable to afford these fees. Additionally, many private veterinarians are willing to work with clients interested in spaying or neutering their dogs.

Have other cities or parishes that have adopted this type of ordinance been successful?
Progressive communities throughout the country have adopted similar ordinances and had tremendous results. Before 1995, the Santa Cruz animal shelter in California warehoused 14,000 animals a year. Today, it takes in about 5,500. Euthanasia has dropped by 50%. More animals get adopted from the shelter today because they can stay longer in their cages -- spaying and neutering laws have resulted in fewer unwanted litters and fewer strays roaming the streets. Lake, Los Angeles and Stanislaus counties followed Santa Cruz's lead, as did the cities of Sacramento, San Bernardino, Houston, Asheville, and Palm Beach.

How long will it take to see the impact of this ordinance? Within 12 months the City of New Orleans should begin to see a modest stream of income from the permits and violation fines. By the end of five years, the animal shelter should begin to see a decline in its intake. By the end of 10 years, the animal shelter should begin to report a decline in its euthanasia rates.
Contact your City Council Person today to show your support for this ordinance:

Your City Council Person

You would think... Henri & Isabelle...

video

Long walkin' + training class with our teacher = still going at it!